Tag Archive | students

Analyzing Disney Media & Millenials As A Marketing Intern in New York This Summer.

This past summer, I interned for Disney Media Ad Sales and Marketing in New York. My department’s responsibility was to provide Sales with the tools, resources and marketing ideas they need to drive advertising revenue for Disney Channel, Disney X D, Disney Junior and Radio Disney. From my first day at Disney to my last, I was treated as if I was another member of the department which meant I was expected to do analyst level work. This gave me an appreciation of how this key unit functioned as well as what life in the real world would be like in two years when I graduate. While the commute from my home on Long Island was a bit taxing and expensive ($382 a month), going to sleep at 930PM to wake at 6AM was the biggest adjustment I had to make as any normal Hopkins student could attest to.

DisneyInternship

Many of the tasks I was assigned focused on the Research side of the business. I had to create a weekly “Landscape Report,” which outlined the competitive environment for Disney Media as well as updating other key reports which encompassed anything from analyzing VOD (Video On Demand) Ad campaigns to pulling weekly ratings from the StarTrak system for stunts (airing shows out of their normal time periods) and marathons (running a whole season of past episodes back to back). One of the main lessons I learned from the summer is that the Ad Sales Department of Disney only needs one story to tell in order to sell a spot to a potential company. You could comb through mountains of data, but all you need is one positive nugget of information and you run with it. Additionally, if a point you want to use doesn’t necessarily work at first, there are ways to make it work by using phrases like one of the highest rated instead of the highest rated or by saying the show is number one in its time period as opposed to comparing it to all programs that air throughout the week.

I also worked on projects that dealt more with “Consumer Insights.” For example, I developed numerous decks for clients ranging from addressing the interests of “Hispanic Consumers with Pets” to the affinity and preferences of “Toys and Games for Preschoolers and Toddlers.” I analyzed large Mintel Reports and from there, I generated stories that likened a consumer and their affinity for the Disney brand. I specifically enjoyed these projects as they allowed me to get creative and play with images and market the company to the best of my ability.

I also wrote sections of “Ad-Intel” Reports which analyzed the business foundation of potential advertisers such as Nike and Microsoft. I analyzed anything from current products to their key target demographics to their potential revenue stream for FY 14. By breaking down these industry giants, I was able to understand the fundamentals of running some of the most successful corporations in the world.

I was also chosen to be “Group Leader” and oversee an Intern Project that dealt with media consumption among the Millennial Generation. The “Disney Media” portion of the project focused on analyzing specific social media tendencies in the kid space, which became a bit tricky as you are not supposed to join a social media site until you reach the age of 13. However, we were able to determine that although kids aren’t supposed to be on social media before 13, they are. As a result, a lot of the same patterns we found with Millenials and their use of social media rang true for kids as well.

I along with 12 other interns presented our Millenials data to 80+ Executives from throughout the Disney/ABC Television Group. Being able to not only craft a presentation but to verbalize it as well is an invaluable skill that I will need later on in the business world. I made it through without any “ummms” or pauses, and I even answered ad hoc questions in the middle of my portion. It really is something to have people in the audience who have generated billions of dollars in ad revenue for Disney, ABC and ABC Family listen to your words and take in the slides that you created.

Besides the networking aspects in the television industry that this internship provided, it really proved to me that I would love to one day pursue a career in the media/marketing side of business. This summer I was lucky enough to come to work for a company that affects millions of lives a day and that everybody recognizes. Therefore, you take extra responsibility and pride in everything you create. Don’t tell anyone but Disney Channel now joins ESPN as my favorite network and I’ll be watching “Girl Meets World” every week when it returns for its second season (date and time to be announced).

Glenn Hyams, Class of ’16

Writing Seminars Major, Minor in Entrepreneurship & Management, Concentration in Marketing

JHU Graduate Produces Mother’s Day Video.

Ever since I started my graduate school adventure at Miami Ad School San Francisco (a portfolio school for advertising), I have been shown the true value of personal projects.

Personal projects that allow one to freely execute a campaign without being limited by the corporate aspects of advertising; personal projects that encourage individuals to pursue something true to themselves, while having fun playing with social norms.

This is how the idea of “Call Your Mom” came about. Everyday, we walk by so many strangers without interacting with them at all. My team and I wanted to break this social norm and get to know strangers in a unique way – by gaining insight into their relationship with their moms.

We therefore took to the streets of San Francisco and asked people when they had last called their moms. The end result was beautiful, and fully supported a notion we strongly believe in: if you are passionate about an idea, go and execute it. The benefits of advertising don’t just have to come from the professional workplace.

 Jiayi Wang ’13

I hope you enjoy it …

Are You A Startup Seeking Funds And Support? Try Google Ventures.

GoogleVenturesGoogle innately understands the power of a simple idea, a simple idea that will not become anything more unless it is supported intellectually and financially. Google Ventures, founded in 2009, is the venture capitalist investment arm of Google that selects technology startups to invest in. Its purpose is to provide funding for “entrepreneurs with a healthy disregard for the impossible”  and is certainly one of the company’s most promising solutions for new businesses.

Google’s Startup Lab uniquely blends expertise in the field of startup technology companies and provides an opportunity for companies to learn, work and share ideas. Google presents the platform for entrepreneurs to initiate conversation and attract funding to turn the fruits of these conversations into functioning prototypes.

The services provided through Google Ventures include assistance with marketing strategy, developing an engineering team, working with a functional design team and more. Below is just one of the companies Google Ventures has helped.

Upstart is one of the Google Ventures companies now helping student startups.

Upstart is one Google Ventures company now helping student entrepreneurs with their startups.

It is safe to say that a simple idea fostered through Google Ventures has the potential to become the next must-have consumer product or business solution.

Just one example of Google honoring its history and innately understanding what entrepreneurs need most, Google Ventures is a start up support system unlike any other venture fund in the world.

Do you have an idea they make like?

– Erica Zehnder

Why You Should Attend the Fall 2012 Career Fair

Each semester, Johns Hopkins University hosts a career fair on its Homewood campus to provide students with the opportunity to converse with potential employers from all over the country.

But wait: didn’t we just have a job fair?

Yes, we did just have the student Job Fair, but this is very different from the Career Fair. While the Job Fair is focused on giving students a chance to apply for on-campus jobs through Johns Hopkins University, the Career Fair gives students the chance to make connections that could provide them with summer internships, full-time jobs after graduation, and other working opportunities during the school year. Curious about who these 130+ employers are? Here are a few to wet your appetite:

  • ESPN
  • Defense Intelligence Agency
  • eBay
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Microsoft
  • Teach for America

Attending the Career Fair can help you make connections, but only if you present yourself well to employers. So do you have to figure this out on your own? Of course not! Fortunately, the JHU Career Center has handily compiled a simple guide on how to prepare for the fair. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Bring a current resume.
  • Wear nice clothing. No ripped jeans or t-shirts.
  • Do your research and locate the employers you wish to visit prior to arriving at the fair. This will save you time searching for your employers’ tables.
  • Be sure to mention your name, major, expected graduation date, and reasons for being interested in a particular field to employers.

A LinkedIn profile is a good way to present yourself to potential employers.

Having an active, clean social media presence is also crucial to employment success. According to an article by Forbes contributor Dan Schawbel, a solid online presence is much more important than a neat resume. You should create a Twitter account and update it; you should make sure there is no profanity or distasteful content on your Facebook page. Make a LinkedIn profile. If you put yourself on the Internet, employers can find you, and you want them to like what they see.

If you want to make strides with your career, then make sure you attend the Fall 2012 Career Fair in the Ralph S. O’Connor Recreation Center on Thursday, September 20th, from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm. Get prepared and get hired!

For a full list of career fair employees, click here. If you have questions about the fair, leave them a comment or call the Career Center at 410 516-8056.

– Dave