Tag Archive | Internships

My Internship Experience With The Orioles.

Up until this semester, a pigeon was the only bird I associated with Charm City and orange was something that you ate, not a color that fit into my wardrobe. All that changed when I became an intern for the team that became a phenomenon this summer and fall, The Baltimore Orioles. I was assigned to the Corporate Sales and Partnership Marketing program and was exposed to the contracts and proposals for current and upcoming sponsorship accounts. Furthermore, I assisted and led many game day promotions and events that were directly correlated to the servicing of sponsorship contracts. The Orioles have over 100 sponsorship deals in place that range from the obvious advertisements plastered all across the outfield walls to more subtle details such as the “Natty Boh Brot” or a “GEICO” logo mounted on the bottom of the ALCS rally towels. In the end, whether you realize it or not, Camden Yards is filled with the logos and merchandise of local companies such as Under Armour to globally recognized brands such as Budweiser all throughout the park.Glenn

My tasks fell into two categories: gameday promotions and office duties. To start, gameday promotions mostly dealt with providing our sponsors with top-notch hospitality that includes all different kinds of perks. For example, one of the most prolific clients for the Orioles is Bank of America. Therefore, during game 1 of the ALCS, I escorted around 12 clients from Bank of America down onto the field for Batting Practice. At this time, these clients got to experience what it’s like for a player to be down on the field prior to a playoff game. These clients would be within arms reach of all the Orioles players and coaching staff. Frequently, these clients would ask, “You must be used to this by now,” and to be honest, I can’t say I ever got used to such a surreal experience. The whole city got behind the Orioles during their playoff run, and there truly was no place like Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

One of my more surreal moments was when I was side by side with Mr. Boh himself who was set to throw out the first pitch during an afternoon matchup against the Yankees. I escorted him onto the field, and he asked me (while in full costume), “Do you have any advice for throwing out the first pitch?” It was just a very funny situation as I was seen talking to a mascot that Baltimore seems to idolize. Some fans may have thought I was a bit crazy as it looked like I was just talking to myself, but in reality, I was doing my best to keep Mr. Boh at ease.

Glenn2Aside from the meet and greets with players, I’d have to say that my favorite promotion to run was the “Esskay Steal Second Base” contest. For this promotion, I would meet the contestant (who is usually around 8 years old) and their parent at the “Fan Assistance” Entrance of Camden Yards. From there, I would take them into the grounds crew area where the contestant is briefed on the task that lies ahead. They simply have to run from the outfield wall to second base in the middle of the fifth inning and pick up second base. Then, they must run it back to the outfield wall in under a minute. If accomplished, the contestant gets to keep the base, and it really is an unforgettable experience for the young boy or girl. When the contest is running, I am on the field and direct the child where to go. Again, Esskay is getting their name out there by sponsoring this event as the child is wearing an Orioles’ jersey with “Esskay” on the back.

A major project that I worked on for my office duties had to deal with brand recognition and monitoring the reach of each sponsor. It is quite a difficult task to really conclude how many people see a certain sign in the Park, or a distinct billboard as they travel up a ramp to their seats. Therefore, I created a deck in order to find some of the most reliable and accredited programs that could put a number on how many people see certain signage. This was a very interesting task for me as I was able to study and analyze what a consumer really recognizes when watching a ballgame. For example, a great catch by Adam Jones in Center Field can be shown on the local news, ESPN and all across the country. As a result, brands are not only reaching a local audience, but they also are being viewed by people all across the country as well. Therefore, the Orioles had to show their clients that it would be beneficial to the company to agree on such deals because millions of eyeballs are seeing their company on a daily basis. Overall, finding a program to put a distinct number on how many people recognize certain sponsorship was vital to the Orioles’ Corporate Sales Department.

Interning with the 2014 AL East Champions truly was an incredible experience. From my interview to my time in the office, everything about the organization was first class. I am quite lucky to be able to say I am part of such a storied franchise, and I am excited to be back for the start of the 2015 season. Orange and black is now an integral part of my wardrobe. Go O’s!

Glenn Hyams ‘16

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JHU AMA Presents: Student Alumni Panel

Earlier this month, the Johns Hopkins University undergraduate chapter of the American Marketing Association (JHU AMA) kicked off its Fall Speaker Series with a panel of JHU alumni working in marketing and advertising capacities. These alumni included representatives from Under Armour, AOL Digital, T. Rowe Price, Stanley Black & Decker, IMRE, and Factory Athletics. Students interested in pursuing careers in marketing, advertising, and digital media fields attended the event to learn more about the various industries represented.

Alumni Taylor Schulte, Tyler Goodell, Claire Sandgrass, Zoe Longenecker-Wright, Dave Carisiti, and Jason Budden speak at the alumni panel.

Alumni Taylor Schulte, Tyler Goodell, Claire Sandgrass, Zoe Longenecker-Wright, Dave Carisiti, and Jason Budden speak at the alumni panel.

The alumni spoke about several topics, most of which focused on breaking into the marketing industry, tips for surviving your first few months on the jobs, and other pieces of advice centered on helping current students make the most of their college experience to prepare for a transition into the real world. Richard L, an event attendee, commented that “thanks to them [the alumni], I feel much more prepared to send out job applications than I had before.”

Some key takeaways from the event:

  • Connect, connect, connect! Expand your professional network by reaching out to people in the industry via LinkedIn. (Note: always send a personalized message when seeking to connect).
  • Try it out. Find an internship, either during the semester or summer, in a marketing-related field, to see if it’s for you. An internship in this field is also critical if you want to land a job at a firm.
  • Clean up. Make sure your social media pages are devoid of undesirable content and make sure your resume is always updated and polished.

The JHU AMA will be hosting multiple upcoming events, the next of which is on Monday, November 10th. Hershey Associate Brand Manager Anthony Criezis will be speaking as part of the AMA’s Fall Speaker Series, and all interested parties are encouraged to attend a very informative discussion!

Analyzing Disney Media & Millenials As A Marketing Intern in New York This Summer.

This past summer, I interned for Disney Media Ad Sales and Marketing in New York. My department’s responsibility was to provide Sales with the tools, resources and marketing ideas they need to drive advertising revenue for Disney Channel, Disney X D, Disney Junior and Radio Disney. From my first day at Disney to my last, I was treated as if I was another member of the department which meant I was expected to do analyst level work. This gave me an appreciation of how this key unit functioned as well as what life in the real world would be like in two years when I graduate. While the commute from my home on Long Island was a bit taxing and expensive ($382 a month), going to sleep at 930PM to wake at 6AM was the biggest adjustment I had to make as any normal Hopkins student could attest to.

DisneyInternship

Many of the tasks I was assigned focused on the Research side of the business. I had to create a weekly “Landscape Report,” which outlined the competitive environment for Disney Media as well as updating other key reports which encompassed anything from analyzing VOD (Video On Demand) Ad campaigns to pulling weekly ratings from the StarTrak system for stunts (airing shows out of their normal time periods) and marathons (running a whole season of past episodes back to back). One of the main lessons I learned from the summer is that the Ad Sales Department of Disney only needs one story to tell in order to sell a spot to a potential company. You could comb through mountains of data, but all you need is one positive nugget of information and you run with it. Additionally, if a point you want to use doesn’t necessarily work at first, there are ways to make it work by using phrases like one of the highest rated instead of the highest rated or by saying the show is number one in its time period as opposed to comparing it to all programs that air throughout the week.

I also worked on projects that dealt more with “Consumer Insights.” For example, I developed numerous decks for clients ranging from addressing the interests of “Hispanic Consumers with Pets” to the affinity and preferences of “Toys and Games for Preschoolers and Toddlers.” I analyzed large Mintel Reports and from there, I generated stories that likened a consumer and their affinity for the Disney brand. I specifically enjoyed these projects as they allowed me to get creative and play with images and market the company to the best of my ability.

I also wrote sections of “Ad-Intel” Reports which analyzed the business foundation of potential advertisers such as Nike and Microsoft. I analyzed anything from current products to their key target demographics to their potential revenue stream for FY 14. By breaking down these industry giants, I was able to understand the fundamentals of running some of the most successful corporations in the world.

I was also chosen to be “Group Leader” and oversee an Intern Project that dealt with media consumption among the Millennial Generation. The “Disney Media” portion of the project focused on analyzing specific social media tendencies in the kid space, which became a bit tricky as you are not supposed to join a social media site until you reach the age of 13. However, we were able to determine that although kids aren’t supposed to be on social media before 13, they are. As a result, a lot of the same patterns we found with Millenials and their use of social media rang true for kids as well.

I along with 12 other interns presented our Millenials data to 80+ Executives from throughout the Disney/ABC Television Group. Being able to not only craft a presentation but to verbalize it as well is an invaluable skill that I will need later on in the business world. I made it through without any “ummms” or pauses, and I even answered ad hoc questions in the middle of my portion. It really is something to have people in the audience who have generated billions of dollars in ad revenue for Disney, ABC and ABC Family listen to your words and take in the slides that you created.

Besides the networking aspects in the television industry that this internship provided, it really proved to me that I would love to one day pursue a career in the media/marketing side of business. This summer I was lucky enough to come to work for a company that affects millions of lives a day and that everybody recognizes. Therefore, you take extra responsibility and pride in everything you create. Don’t tell anyone but Disney Channel now joins ESPN as my favorite network and I’ll be watching “Girl Meets World” every week when it returns for its second season (date and time to be announced).

Glenn Hyams, Class of ’16

Writing Seminars Major, Minor in Entrepreneurship & Management, Concentration in Marketing

Successful Media Monitoring at maslansky + partners.

In expanding on my internship with maslansky + partners (m+p) from this past summer, I can definitively say that the firm understands the importance of monitoring both social media and the greater media in general.  Founded on the principle—“It’s not what you say, it’s what they hear. ®”—maslansky + partners practices what they preach by making sure they are constantly in tune with the media.  As m+p takes on a project, they make it their responsibility to help a client share their story with their audience.  And part of this responsibility involves knowing what has been said in the past and what is being said in the present, so they can properly help the client tell their story for the future.  This is extremely important, since m+p will only be able to appropriately recommend a strategy if they approach the situation with a complete understanding of the client’s identity, both perceived and defined.

There are several ways in which m+p filers through the media—through Google alerts, a collected ad database, in depth focus groups, and through an analysis process called WireTap™.  Google alerts are one of the most underutilized services available to the public for free.  Provided by the search engine Google, users are able to receive email alerts customizable by their interests, which can range from general news to specific keywords.  The firm also maintains a collection of advertisements, which not only offer an in house resource for m+p staff, but also for the general public (http://ads.maslansky.com/).

Social media monitoring

The advertisements are entered with key information (context, industry, publication, etc.) that allows users to filter through them.  Another way that m+p listens to the general public is through in depth focus group sessions.  These focus group sessions are designed to understand how a particular client is perceived by its audience, which is done through exercises, question and answer sessions, and individual interviews.  Depending on the client, these can be the most lucrative for comprehending an organization’s presence within society, due to the unfiltered nature of the sessions.  The final aspect in which m+p works to understand a client’s target audience, specifically through social media, is through their WireTap™ Analysis.  This is a social media report that helps identify and analyze target language sourced from social media interactions.  In addition, this report allows m+p to understand and hear the specific opinions and conversations being communicated on the World Wide Web.

In a society full of distrust, it is valuable to understand the power of language.  Monitoring and being aware of what is being said through public opinion allows one to harness this power.  Lucky for us, we are fortunate to have many resources today that help aid us in this process.  All that’s left is for us to take advantage of it.

– Kathrin

Marketing Internship with a Language Focus

This past summer I worked for maslansky + partners (m+p), a research driven communication strategy firm. Their enterprise is founded on the following principle—“It’s not what you say, it’s what they hear. ®” Specifically focusing on language, m+p works to understand the target audience in order to help companies share their stories and communicate their brand. They approach each client with a clear perspective in order to provide a unique strategy, which is aided by their Instant Response Dial Technology. This technology is utilized within focus groups—participants receive dials, which range from 0 to 100.  Dials are initially set at 50; as testing messages are read, participants dial up (100 is highly positive) or down (0 is highly negative) second by second to record their reactions. Look below to see Instant Response Dial Technology in action:

My internship with m+p as a Language Strategy Intern spanned from May till August, and throughout the summer I was able to work with their dial technology for a variety of clients. Some of the clients I had the opportunity to work on projects for included AARP, Bank of America, Axe, Toyota, and the National Pork Board. On a day to day basis, my duties ranged from helping with focus group planning, data analysis, assisting with business proposals and presentations, and researching both current and potential clients.

In my idle time, I was tasked with researching Procter & Gamble in the interest of tracking and analyzing the organization’s language. My goal was to discover what they did well, what they did poorly, how they reacted to events, and how they are changing their language, if at all. All of my conclusions went in a deliverable that was presented to the company at the end of the summer. This long term project was one of the things I most enjoyed working on at m+p—I was able to spend time looking at one company in a very different way—with a language lens. Instead of thinking of message creation, I was able to dissect messages and key in on how specific messages succeeded or failed.

P&G

P&G response to environmental testing on Tide.

One particular finding I found interesting from my Procter & Gamble (P&G) research was in regards to their product, Tide. In 2011, Women’s Voices (an environmental group) tested a range of cleaning products to learn about their ingredients. Of the tested products, Tide came back positive for a potential carcinogen called 1,4 dioxane. Women’s Voices contacted P&G for a response to the test, yet P&G chose silence as opposed to making a statement. When P&G eventually agreed to reformulate the product line, reactions were already rippling through market channels, especially social media. Even though some consumers seemed lost to the brand, others were willing to give it a second chance. However, if P&G had reacted differently to the testing, fewer consumers may have dropped the brand.

Not only did I thoroughly enjoy my time with m+p, but in addition, my internship opened my mind and changed how I perceived language. Words are no longer just vessels to carry messages. Instead, each specific word has a purpose and provides an audience with a connotation that is either positive or negative. Use the proper words, and you have the dynamic ability to capture the full potential of your message. I know that what I learned with m+p will not only help me with my future job endeavors, but throughout my life as well and that is something I am truly grateful for.

– Kathrin Hashemi

How I Got Into Venture Capital With A Dual Degree In Biomedical Engineering and Applied Math & Statistics, And A Minor In Entrepreneurship & Management.

I began thinking about what I wanted to do with my life and what type of career I wanted back in high school. Thanks to some pretty stellar and unique engineering internships, I decided I wanted to be an engineer, but wasn’t sure which kind. I was also interested in being a doctor so Biomedical Engineering seemed like a solid compromise.

Boom!  In the blink of an eye I am picking out my classes for my first semester at The Johns Hopkins University.  I selected Introduction to Business since the topic was of interest to me and the course would help me satisfy several graduation requirements. While at the time I thought this course would just be an interesting elective, it turned out to be a pivotal course for shaping my future career path.

bozada_senior_year_hockey

Over the next two years, I would spend the summers and winter breaks working at a DOD lab back home as an engineer. However, through those internships and my BME coursework I learned I did not enjoy being an engineer. What should you do if this happens you?

1. Don’t freak out.

Biomedical engineering is by far the most interesting technological field right now.  To date, I pride myself on keeping up to date with advances in both the “science” and the “techniques.”  Yet, I had decided that I did not want to be an engineer and I had decided that being a doctor was also not in the cards.  So I asked myself, “What have you done on this campus that you truly have enjoyed? Not just intellectually, but the actual process of completion?”

2. Go to “first meetings of the year.”

Go to as many first meetings as possible for any organization you might be interested in.  While there is no way you can (or should) do them all, it’s a great way to find some niches of which you had been previously unaware.  I had the great privilege of being a part of many groups on campus including (but not limited to) SGA, AKPsi, The Pre-Law Society, the Politik, Senior Leadership Consultants, and the club Ice-Hockey team.

3. Listen to yourself. 

When I self-evaluated I realized my true day-to-day passion revolved around business. Mind you, this is not the most reassuring realization. Fortunately, there was some precedence for this type of thought. The solution for most Hopkins engineers is to go into some sort of consulting. Which makes sense; you can use a lot of the same equations and all of the same analytical skills. Instead of optimizing a cell pathway, you’re optimizing logistics for some big corporation.

4. Don’t rush a decision.

If you are already pivoting from what you are studying, make sure you pick the right pivot. A lot of my peers went on into consulting. Yet, personally, something didn’t “feel” right. Basically, I would be engineering for businesses, not actually doing business. “And what about the science?” I asked myself. Shouldn’t I stay involved somehow?

The semester before I was having this conversation with myself, I was taking an E&M course called “Managing Social Enterprises” which was all about how management styles differ between social and for-profit companies as well as startups vs established companies. It was from this class that I finally found my answer. I would love to join the Venture Capital/Startup world. This would allow me to practice business plus stay connected to the biomedical world. The question was–how?

5. Talk to everyone.

It is not so easy to be a BME/AMS double major and decide you want to go into VC.  Most VCs have been to business school and/or worked for a successful startup.  I had not.  Fortunately, one night I happened to be in DC visiting some friends.  While hanging at a local bar, I started talking to someone who knew a local VC and he put us in contact.

6.  Internships!

You may or may not be paid, but such is the nature of internships in 2013. The most important thing is the experience the internships provide, not the paycheck, so be sure to take advantage of internships even if they are unpaid.  During my senior spring I interned for Fortify Ventures, an early-stage tech VC firm located in DC. While I was what you would call a gopher, I learned quite a few valuable lessons. I was able to turn this internship into another internship, joining the investment team at the Center for Innovative Technology, an early-stage VC firm located in Herndon, VA. Fortunately for me, CIT invested in not only technology firms, but also green energy and biotech companies. So it was at CIT that I finally began evaluating companies, thus gaining some true VC experience while still only being an intern.

7. Leverage where you are to get one step closer.

Before I could be considered a viable candidate for full-time (non-intern) position at a VC firm, I needed to either go to business school, get my Ph.D., or join a successful startup. I chose the third option. While my true passion is biotech, I chose a tech company for a practical reason. Biotech startups take ten years to grow and tech startups take just two to three years.

2013_bozada_cupidscup_edit

Last October, a video-processing company called Veenome came and pitched CIT. Being on the investment team at CIT, I was able to get a clearer picture of Veenome than most of the other applicants and was thus able to land a job with Veenome. Here I am, six months later, truly enjoying work everyday and very well poised for the career I want. Yet, I often think about what would have happened if I had not listened to myself and had stayed an engineer.

– TJ Bozada

Why You Should Attend the Fall 2012 Career Fair

Each semester, Johns Hopkins University hosts a career fair on its Homewood campus to provide students with the opportunity to converse with potential employers from all over the country.

But wait: didn’t we just have a job fair?

Yes, we did just have the student Job Fair, but this is very different from the Career Fair. While the Job Fair is focused on giving students a chance to apply for on-campus jobs through Johns Hopkins University, the Career Fair gives students the chance to make connections that could provide them with summer internships, full-time jobs after graduation, and other working opportunities during the school year. Curious about who these 130+ employers are? Here are a few to wet your appetite:

  • ESPN
  • Defense Intelligence Agency
  • eBay
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Microsoft
  • Teach for America

Attending the Career Fair can help you make connections, but only if you present yourself well to employers. So do you have to figure this out on your own? Of course not! Fortunately, the JHU Career Center has handily compiled a simple guide on how to prepare for the fair. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Bring a current resume.
  • Wear nice clothing. No ripped jeans or t-shirts.
  • Do your research and locate the employers you wish to visit prior to arriving at the fair. This will save you time searching for your employers’ tables.
  • Be sure to mention your name, major, expected graduation date, and reasons for being interested in a particular field to employers.

A LinkedIn profile is a good way to present yourself to potential employers.

Having an active, clean social media presence is also crucial to employment success. According to an article by Forbes contributor Dan Schawbel, a solid online presence is much more important than a neat resume. You should create a Twitter account and update it; you should make sure there is no profanity or distasteful content on your Facebook page. Make a LinkedIn profile. If you put yourself on the Internet, employers can find you, and you want them to like what they see.

If you want to make strides with your career, then make sure you attend the Fall 2012 Career Fair in the Ralph S. O’Connor Recreation Center on Thursday, September 20th, from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm. Get prepared and get hired!

For a full list of career fair employees, click here. If you have questions about the fair, leave them a comment or call the Career Center at 410 516-8056.

– Dave